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Thursday, October 16 2008
Architecture Department Lecture - Thomas Phifer
7:00pm-9:00pmin Kocimski Auditorium, 101 College of Design

Thomas Phifer, Principal, Thomas Phifer and Partners, New York, NY.              Founding principal of the New York City-based firm of Thomas Phifer and Partners, New York, architect Thomas Phifer is widely admired for buildings that relate poetically to both the natural and human ecologies of their sites; employ advanced technologies and modes of construction to dictate the appropriate architectural forms, spaces, and effects; and transform their communities by suggesting the sublime.  Born and raised in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1953, Phifer has demonstrated his deft abilities with deceptive simplicity in a variety of building types, ranging from corporate headquarters and university buildings, to residences and buildings across the United States.  In 2005, Thomas Phifer and Partners was chosen by the Mayor's Office of New York City to redesign the streetlights of the city.  Prior to launching his eponymous firm in 1997, Phifer was design partner with the firm of Richard Meier & Partners, New York, where he was responsible for the design of 27 major projects.  He was educated at Clemson University, where he received both BA and MA degrees in architecture.  In 1995, Phifer was recipient of the prestigious Rome Prize in Architecture from the American Academy in Rome, honored with a 1996 residency at the Academy's renowned campus on the Janiculum Hill.  During that period, Phifer explored ways to draw the lessons of antiquity--enduring concepts for architecture that are ecologically enlightened, relevant to time and place, animated and dignified--into a 21st-century building language that now characterizes his practice.  The influence of this investigation is present in his current work, where landscape and architecture intermingle to create a place of relevance and purpose.

 

 

Sponsored by the Curt F. Dale Lectures and Architecture Advisory Council Lectures